Month: February 2002

Steve Zellers: “Why isn’t an asynchronous protocol built on top of HTTP not HTTP anymore? Just make both sides web servers and agree on how to match up requests with responses.”

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Craig Burton: “I have spent the last week upgrading six machines to Windows XP. On average it takes me eight to ten hours to complete. One took me around sixteen.”

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Looks like Tom Clifton is doing some fun stuff with Radio and images. He posted a screen shot last week, and now he has a Tool you can download.

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This is intriguing.

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I also somehow missed this post on Jonathan Delacour’s site about weblog comments and paradigm shifts:

“Radio users are building tools, macros, Web services, and a bunch of other stuff that I’m not even aware of. Until today I believed I couldn’t contribute anything substantial to that effort — and that’s OK, my ambitions lie in storytelling (and the stories I tell, when I manage to tell them well, generate lots of appreciative feedback). But today three very smart people responded to my post and, as a result, I felt connected to Radio developers.”

Jonathan goes on to say:

“Now I discover — and I have to tell you it’s disconcerting — that I’m getting a crash education in collaborative writing. This isn’t what I signed up for and yet it’s fascinating and exhilarating and I wouldn’t want to miss it for the world. But there’s an underlying complication — the “best writing” that Burningbird cites is hidden within the comment windows. How do we expose that writing?”

For the most part, I’ll let that rest where it is, but there is one point I feel the need to make. There’s almost certainly more work to be done here, but it’s important that the work be done thoughtfully, to make sure that we don’t leave our readers confused and frustrated.

They understand popup windows, even though that understanding probably comes at the expence of all of us having to tolerate the abhorrent disruption that constitutes the pop-up ad phenomenon. They also understand mailing lists, and some know about permalinks.

But if we move too quickly, and introduce too many user interface elements, we run the dual risk of confusing readers with extraneous pixels that they may not understand, and making a mistake in driving the paradigm shift, that unnecessarily limits our choices in the future.

To quote Dave quoting Al Pacino: Inch by inch…

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I missed this tidbit from David Brown on Sunday: “Little by little I’m getting it. Little by little I see Radio turning into a dream environment.”

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According to this article on cnn.com, some members of Osama bin Laden’s family have been asked to supply DNA samples, in order to determine whether Osama was killed in a recent CIA missile strike.

“One of the people killed in the strike has been described as tall, dressed in Arab white robes, and treated with deference by others, leading to speculation that it could have been bin Laden.”

This leads me to wonder whether the bin Ladin family DNA might be compared with future detainees’ DNA, under the pretense that he’s undergone plastic surgery to hide his identity, as Imad Mughniyah is runored to have done.

Apparently I’m not the first to have thought of this, but it also begs the question of what else DNA tests might be used for, in this new age of sacrificing personal privacy for want of security.

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Alanis Morrisette: “My greatest vision of myself is to be as transparent as I can.”

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Will Smith, on Inside the Actor’s Studio: “I learned very early, that anything that you’re working, is about the team.”

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