Jake Savin Posts

When it comes to fighting back against Trump, there are so many issues it may be hard to figure out what to focus on first. Here’s my take:

Choose the issue or issues that have the following attributes, specifically for you:

  • You are passionate about the issue.
  • You have applicable knowledge or skills.
  • You know or can find people to help you.

These are more important than whether it’s the biggest issue or the one generating the biggest controversy, or even the worst effects.
If you have knowledge and passion about an issue, and can find ways to connect with other like-minded activists, you can become an effective advocate. If not, you risk wasting time and energy that you would more effectively invest elsewhere.

Originally posted on Facebook.
See also: trumpstatus.org.

Politics

Someone was asking at work earlier about what computers people had owned or programmed on. I don’t think I’d ever made a list before, so I decided to make one. This list includes computers I’ve programmed on outside of a professional capacity, or owned personally.

There are lots more machines I’ve used to greater or lesser extents in my professional life. The ones listed here are the machines I feel a personal connection with. (Yeah, I just said that I have a personal connection with some computers.)

Here’s what I came up with roughly in chronological order:

[Edit: Added links]

 

Uncategorized

I’ve said this in a few other places:

There are potentially important conflicts of interest in Microsoft now owning LinkedIn. A few examples:

  • Microsoft will gain visibility into private profiles and hidden information in public profiles, job listings, applications, etc. for many thousands of competitors and their employees.
  • Microsoft could potentially watch for changes to private profiles of current Microsoft employees to see who is thinking of leaving.
  • Microsoft could monitor interactions between current employees and recruiters, other companies, job applications, etc.

Any of these things could be done in aggregate without violating any laws or privacy policies. More troubling is that these powers could also be misused either in an official capacity or seriptiously by unscruplous employees or managers.

Microsoft monitoring employee behavior isn’t unprecedented. I’d heard that in the mid-2000’s, there were instances where security would be called to escort people out of the building if their manager found out that they’d accepted a position at Google. It also was (is?) a fireable offense in some teams if engineers were caught reading patents or looking at code from open source projects.

I have no evidence that Microsoft will actually do any of those things, but…

I. Don’t. Like it.

Microsoft Privacy Uncategorized